Welcome to St. Andrew

Scroll Down to Experience This Virtual Worship Service

In addition to this Virtual Worship Service, you are invited to join us on Zoom for the All Church Coffee Hour
Sunday, June 21 – 10:00am – 11:00am
It will be a time for Check-in, Prayers, and getting better acquainted in Small Group Conversation.
Bring a church friend!

Use the Zoom link in our Saturday and Sunday emails.
Email the church office if you need the Zoom link: Link Request

SUNDAY – JUNE 21, 2020

Father’s Day Celebration!
Today’s Service: Broadway Gospel

“Love and Loyalty in Hard Times”


Welcome to this “virtual” worship service for Sunday, June 21, 2020

Many thanks to Ron Moser (production and artistic touches), Amy Cox (formatting and posting), Caryn Prince and Jan Reynolds (song / video selections), Ricky Bolanos, Kelsey Walthard and Dawne Carver (teachings for children and youth).


Click the arrow below to enjoy this amusing Father’s Day Message:

Praise Song

Discovery Time & Sunday School

Click the arrow to watch Ricky Bolanos present Discovery Time:


Our Sunday School Lessons for today are as follows:

Preschool Memory verse: “These are written so that you may believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God.”
John 20:31

Grades K-5 Memory verse: “Now Faith is confidence in what we hope for and assurance about what we do not see.”
Hebrews 11:1, NIV

Be sure to check our Facebook page for Sunday School videos to share with your children: St. Andrew Sonoma Facebook Page

Message for Youth

I love the Christian music group, Casting Crowns. Their songs have lifted me up, spoke to me in grief and resonate with me at different stages of my life. “Courageous” has been playing in my head for the last week. A part of that has to do with Micah 6:8. God has put that scripture in front of me a lot in the past week as we have been digging into racism and racial injustice. It is a catchy part of the song that sticks with me. “Seek justice, love mercy, walk humbly with your God”. There’s a little more to that verse, but that’s for another time!
The song was actually inspired from a breakfast at the National Day of Prayer in 2008. The song calls fathers to be better spiritual leaders in their homes and work. It starts off with “We were made to be courageous…” It’s a call to action! I think it’s a call for everyone to be better spiritual leaders in their homes. Not just dads. Can you imagine the difference in families if more of our parents (me included) really took time to lead their house in prayer? Wow!

Today we celebrate the dads in our lives. Some are with us physically, some are living on in us. Some the biological dad, some the adopted dad. Some are good and some are not. Some have taken on the role to guide you, to stand up for you and to love you no matter what. Some have walked away.

My dad has been gone from this earth for 7 years and I miss him very much. Today, I remember who he was, how much he loved me and sacrificed for me. Here’s a few things I learned from my dad: He taught me to stand up for what’s right even when it’s hard. To tell the truth. To work hard and play hard. To respect my elders. To do my best in everything I do. To enjoy the beauty of nature. To love, and what true commitment looks like. He was a proud Marine and police officer. He was my rock, even when we didn’t get along. He was a doting grandfather. He was my dad. And I learned so much from him. Even though he’s not here, I still have my memories of him. Some do not have memories of their dad.

We all have another dad. Our heavenly Father. God loves us, guides us and is there for us anytime, anywhere. He loves us so much, He gave His only son to die for our sins. So we can be in relationship with Him! He gives us scripture so we can know Him more and we can learn to be the best person we can be. He gives us the Holy Spirit to guide us and to give us peace. He is there to comfort us when we are hurting and overwhelmed. He is the light in the darkness. He IS love. He is constantly teaching us about grace, mercy and the power of forgiveness. He is our rock. Always and forever!

Today, take a moment (or more!) to celebrate your dad. Remember what he has done for you and be thankful. If you are struggling with your earthly dad, turn to your heavenly dad. Ask for healing to take place. Hold on to His love. For He loves you more than you can fathom!

Blessings, Dawne Carve

Joys and Concerns

Please let us know how we can support you in prayer this week. We will share requests for prayer with Deacons and staff, and with the congregation as appropriate.
Click on the image below to submit a prayer request.

Pastoral Prayer

Listen to Pastor Jan lead us in this morning’s prayer by clicking on the arrow below:

Our Gracious Father God,

We are grateful that you are a beacon of strength and wisdom. You are our mountain, steadfast and sure. We are grateful that you keep your promise to be with us for all time.

On such brilliant days, with life flourishing and beauty erupting all around, we feel we are in contrast to a world that is in pain. We grieve for those suffering with Covid 19. We grieve for ourselves, with our lives narrowed, not seeing family or friends. We grieve for our long history of racial discrimination in this country.

But today, we have the opportunity to give special thanks to You for fathers and father figures who have guided us, who stand by us with love and loyalty. We ask for your blessings for fathers and their children, and for forgiveness where it is needed. This Father’s Day we remember the many sacrifices fathers make for their children and families. We remember all the father figures in our lives: grandfathers and uncles, brothers and cousins, teachers, pastors and coaches, and the strong women leaders in our families who have taken both roles of mother and father.

In our country and our world, help us find our way back to peace and love. Jesus came with love that has the power to cast out all fear. Shine a light on the shadows in our country so that we can protect those who are vulnerable, and bring healing, health and education to those who have been neglected.

Father God, on this day of bright beauty and sadness, we also bring you our prayers for our church community. Today we pray for those who are suffering, from broken dreams, bodies that are ill or injured, those whose relationships are torn. Bring healing to them in body, mind and spirit. Cover them with grace. Comfort them.

We pray for those climbing impossible mountains. We pray for those who need a song in their hearts to keep them going.

Now, as we pray the prayer your son taught us, let it be our common prayer to You:

Our Father who art in heaven, hallowed be thy name.
Thy kingdom come, thy will be done, on earth as it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread; and forgive us our debts,
as we forgive our debtors.
and lead us not into temptation but deliver us from evil.
For thine is the kingdom and the power and the glory, forever. Amen

Faith Offering

Gratitude to God for the small things in life that give us hope

Please continue your giving during this time, so that St. Andrew may continue to serve our local community and our membership. We recognize that some of you have been impacted financially by economic repercussions of the COVID-19 pandemic. For those of you who can, please continue to give on a regular basis.

There are several options available:

  • Give electronically to the St. Andrew General Fund
  • Set up your donation to St. Andrew to be paid through your bill paying service at your personal bank.
  • Mail a check to St. Andrew, or drop your envelope into our locked mail box: 16290 Arnold Drive, Sonoma, CA 95476

Scripture Reading

Isaiah 51:6, Psalm 121 – Selections

Click the image to see and hear Rev. Jan present the Scripture Reading for today
or read the Scripture below

Isaiah 51: 6

Lift up your eyes to the heavens,
  and look at the earth beneath;
my salvation will be forever,
  and my deliverance will never be ended.


Psalm 121 – Selections

I lift up my eyes to the hills—
  from where will my help come?
My help comes from God,
  who made heaven and earth.

God is your keeper;
God is your shade at your right hand.
God will tend your life.

God will keep
  your going out and your coming in
  from this time on and for evermore.

Sermon

The Sound of Music: Love and Loyalty in Hard Times

Isaiah 51:6 and Psalm 121
Rev. Jan Reynolds

Click the image to see and hear Rev. Jan’s Sermon
or read the Sermon below

What do we most treasure? Security, a roof over our heads, our families, and friends of course.

Sometimes all we hold seems fleeting or insecure.

What are we most loyal to and how might that change over time? That’s an even bigger question, perhaps.

The Sound of Music, the 1959 musical by Rodgers and Hammerstein was adapted as a 1965 film musical starring Julie Andrews and Christopher Plummer; it won five Academy Awards, one for best picture. The musical is set in Austria, just before its annexation into Nazi Germany in March 1938.

In the first scenes of the movie, Maria, a young whimsical nun in training, seems a bit foolish. She keeps running into trouble, forgetting the time for evening service at the abbey. She commits various small infractions in abbey rules. What are they going to do with a problem like Maria?

But the Mother Superior seems to understand. Maria has other priorities for her life– On the mountain, she finds her connection with God.

As we follow Maria to the Von Trapp household where she will be the children’s governess, we see that all is not carefree. In the background there is the loss of the seven children’s mother, there is the dark backdrop of encroaching Nazis. And their father, Captain Von Trapp, is somewhat cold and very strict. There’s loss and impending loss.

We learn that Maria has a backbone. She refuses to respond to the Captain’s whistle – “human beings needn’t respond to a whistle!” We discover that Maria is neither naïve nor a foolish girl. She is wise and strong. Where did she get that from?

Psalm 121 asks the same question on our behalf.

I lift my eyes to the hills—
  from where will my help come?

The hills in ancient Israel were a place of wisdom – Moses had conversations with God on a mountain and brought down the 10 commandments.

But hills in biblical history also represented danger. They were hideouts for bandits, the terrain was treacherous, and water was often scarce (Jacobson; Pulpit Fiction). The forced migration of the Jewish people to Babylon brought complete disorientation.

Anything that takes us out of our comfortable patterns can seem to threaten our security. That’s what we are experiencing now. When we have no say in the sudden disruptions that life can bring, disorientation is worsened. We feel loss and grief, perhaps remorse, confusion, or anger.

And that is why the song Edelweiss is poignant and meaningful when the Von Trapp family is forced to sing beneath the hanging flags of Nazi Germany. Edelweiss, the small star-shaped flower represents everything this family has loved in their lifetime so far. Everything familiar, everything beloved… home, country, culture, family.

Edelweiss is a flower that blooms again and again, even in the snow. Homeland means many things to the Von Trapps: their history together, the beauty of the land and their estate, the freedom of Austria that, no matter what happens, they hope will bloom again.

It’s natural to hold onto anything that reminds us of safe times, favorite things and places we treasure, or that make us smile, that remind us of past times. Appreciating the beauty and meaning in favorite things and places reminds us of our humanity in tough times.

What are your favorite things? Or places, or activities that bring you comfort and joy, during difficult times?

This enduring story of The Sound of Music raises our sites higher in these times of turmoil.

As the prophet Isaiah said, may we look to the heavens so that we can be present on the Earth beneath our feet. We are right here now, but we may we always value what is eternal, what is good, what never will die. Our help comes from God, who made heaven and earth. God will keep your going out and your coming in from this time on and for evermore.

In Psalm 121, we are reminded of the Creating Love of God, who has made great mountains and tiny beautiful flowers; that God is still at work in the world all around us even when things around us are upended and unsure.

The reading from Isaiah 51:6 has a similar theme:

Lift up your eyes to the heavens,
  and look at the earth beneath;
my salvation will be forever,
  and my deliverance will never be ended.
The Hebrew exiles are challenged to open their eyes and ears again. The prophet demands imagination and new perspective. Isaiah activates the disoriented!

Listen for God’s presence that inspires singing.

The hills fill my heart with the sound of music. My heart wants to sing every song it hears. To sing through the night like a lark who is learning to pray. To sing through the night.

God’s steady love, God, like a mountain before us. The comfort and strength we receive from God allows us to sing through the night. To sing through those times when we can’t see what is going to happen next.

There are terrible things that cannot be vanquished, but sometimes redeemed. Beauty and love live on and inspire us to act, to rise, to make difficult decisions, to leave some things behind so a greater good is followed. You can’t kill what really matters. God’s steadfast loyalty and our enacted love for all God’s people: that’s what really matters.

With God at our feet through the earth, and in front of us as a mountain stands, we are given the strength and perseverance to face our challenges.

There are characters in The Sound of Music who acquiesce to the powers that be. They feel it is safer and easier to accept and join with the Nazis. Captain Von Trapp is pressured to become a spokesman and support for the Nazis. He has a harder choice than it seems… a choice between staying in his home and country, and securing the safety of his family, or to act on his ideals and perhaps lose everything else he loves. He must question his own loyalties and choose the greater loyalty.

The mountain gives Maria perspective – when she looks up at the hills, when she breathes in the Spirit of God, she is stronger and wiser. She lends this strength to her family and when they act it is with courage. Knowing the risks to their lives, she and the Captain refuse to cooperate with the Nazis, and after escaping the pursuit of Nazi officers, they set out, with the children, for the mountains of Switzerland on foot.

We know the real history of the Von Trapp family – they escape to America and earn their living playing music and Maria Von Trapp writes this famous story of their experiences. They become a symbol of resistance to evil. They are loyal to one another, and not blindly loyal to regimes. They are loyal to their ideals and have acted on them.

Where are your loyalties today? What do your greater loyalties require of you at this time?

Like Maria and the Von Trapp family, we weather through the shadows in the presence of a trustworthy God. With our sights on God, we climb every mountain with strong souls and resilience, resistant to evil.

The Hills are alive with the sound of music,

With songs they have sung for a thousand years.

Our hearts will be blessed with the sound of music,

And we will sing once more.

We know the real history of the Von Trapp family – they escape to America and earn their living playing music and Maria Von Trapp writes this famous story of their experiences. They become a symbol of resistance to evil. They are loyal to one another, and not blindly loyal to regimes. They are loyal to their ideals and have acted on them.

Where are your loyalties today? What do your greater loyalties require of you at this time?

Like Maria and the Von Trapp family, we weather through the shadows in the presence of a trustworthy God. With our sights on God, we climb every mountain with strong souls and resilience, resistant to evil.

The Hills are alive with the sound of music,

With songs they have sung for a thousand years.

Our hearts will be blessed with the sound of music,

And we will sing once more.

Sing Along

Climb Every Mountain – by Rodgers and Hammerstein, Sung by The Four Tops


If you would like to receive emails from St. Andrew with current information about our Virtual Services and links to Virtual Meetings click below